Climate Change Denial

July 1, 2014

BALD BLOKES TALK ABOUT EXTREME WEATHER

George Marshall @ 12:57 pm

I was recently privileged to speak on a panel at the British Library about the peculiar lack of public discussion about climate change in areas damaged by extreme weather and the tendency for people to interpret these impacts in terms of their own politics and worldview.

 

Putting the scientific evidence was Prof. Stephen Belcher, the Director of the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research (a man with a very wide business card and a disgacefully full head of hair). Then myself, followed by Bob Ward, the outspoken and always stimulating Director of Policy & Communications at the Grantham Institute for Climate Change.  Chairing is James Randerson, Assistant National News Editor at the Guardian.
 
I discuss these themes more thoroughly in a former blog article, in a report for the Climate Outreach Information Network – After the Floods: Communicating Climate Change Around Extreme Weather and my forthcoming book Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change.

But it is always interesting to see people talk about this in their own words. In early 2014 the wettest month ever recorded -and in Oxford those records go back to 1767! led to widespread flooding (not ‘fooding’ as I first wrote!)

In this video by COIN taken with flood victims in Oxford, even with the water lapping around their feet none of them  talks about climate change until prompted and even then they are split about it.

 

2 Responses to “BALD BLOKES TALK ABOUT EXTREME WEATHER”

  1. Diana Korchien says:

    In a few days time Transition Leytonstone will be screening Chasing Ice, the makers of which claim a 37.5% conversion rate of sceptics after seeing the film (based on audience surveys). Seeing the Arctic visibly melting away over a period of months should give most people pause for thought. All of this liberated potential precipitation! And my favourite argument when people say that the world is getting cooler, not warmer,is to reply – what happens when you put an ice cube in a glass of lemonade? The lemonade gets colder but the ice cube vanishes. The second law of thermodynamics. About the only thing I managed to absorb in physics lessons years ago.

  2. Anne says:

    *Flooding*, not “fooding” (para 4). If only.

    GM: ha ha! thanks Anne

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