Climate Change Denial

July 26, 2006

Climate Change- Bring it On!

George Marshall @ 6:46 pm

Following my posting on ‘lovely apocalypse” below my thanks are due to Dave Hampton, Carbon Coach (see links) for pointing out that the BBC Have Your Say site is the home page for heatwave denial. Here are some of the choice comments voted as favourites by users of the site:

What heat ? It’s called a decent Summer, get used to it.

Come on! A bit of sunshine compared to months of dull grey weather, London looks lovely!

Why is everyone so determined to moan about it? Live a little!!!

What you’re experiencing is weather, not climate change. It’s summer. It’s hot. Perhaps it will be cold in winter too? Or will you put a cold winter down to climate change too?

This is what a real Summer is all about, enjoy it, it could all be over by August…

I really cannot beleive that people are moaning because the sun is shining and it’s hot.

Did people in 1911 (when the last highest tempurature was recorded) blame global warming? Did they go on about stopping gas guzzlers? Nope, thought so. Lets just enjoy it while it lasts beacuse we will be moaning about the cold rain soon.

I am all for global warming if this is the consequence. Just off to spray a few more aerosols, break open some old fridges and leave the car engine running to make sure!

5 Responses to “Climate Change- Bring it On!”

  1. Douglas Coker says:

    Don’t torture yourselves! Ignore sites with posts from ignorant people who spout drivel. Spend your time at Real Climate or the like. Pursuing social change is a process. Some will be in the vanguard or to use marketing terminology, will be pioneers, others will trail in the wake.

    Those who stubbornly resist the AGW/CC message are sad, flat earthers who will eventually be dragged kicking and screaming into the new reality.

    Douglas Coker

  2. Martyn says:

    When the floods come we call them ‘natural anomalies’; when the storms pound we call them ‘freak occurrences’. And now the all too familiar phrase which describes what is fast becoming a yearly norm: the ‘heat wave’. But as with the other euphemisms described here isn’t this expression also fast becoming a misnomer?

    After all, heat wave, by definition, refers to ‘a bout of unusually hot weather’. If climate models are proven right, and they appear to be spot on (besides failing to predict the very rapid pace of advancing climate change), they suggest that the summer we are presently experiencing not only will be seen as normative in years to come but by comparison will seem moderate to summers only decades from now.

    If so, the term heat wave, I suppose, will go the same way as those other pleasant summers we once experienced – a distant memory confined to less extreme times. I wonder then what will be the euphemism of the day? Blazing infernos, perhaps.

  3. Henry Thompson says:

    Data, knowledge, trust, time.

    I don’t know the Data. What is climate change? Nought point nought nought three of a celcius or what? Who says this is significant?

    Even if I did have the data would I have the Knowledge to understand what I was looking at and what it meant? Statistics, models, hypotheses, eye of newt and toe of baboon.

    And would I Trust the integrity of the people who produced it? Governments, government, corporate or independent. What’s independent? How many agendas do I need to understand in order to be able to smell bias?

    When am I supposed to give myself the Time do the reading and unpack this stuff.?

    I am a natural skeptic – as an excuse for laziness. I was handed Bjorn Lomborg but never read it. I like the precautionary principle – but I own and run a car. I distrust reactionary populism. Did the Bishop of whatsit do the science before he claimed/decreed that cheap flights are immoral?

    I don’t buy Kenyan beans or Brazillian mangoes. Sooner or later I’ll buy a solar water heater and convert my car to LPG. But I like bananas and coffee.

    And I wonder if there is any way that us clever monkeys, squatting atop the leavings of our primordial soup, could ever actually change the vastness above us?

  4. Douglas Coker says:

    Let’s suppose, for a moment, we lived in a world where we had a wide range of ideas, philosophies and future scenarios to believe in. They might range from the wonderful through the ordinary and mundane to the frightening. Who, if it was on offer, as part of the menu, would choose to believe in something as awful as AGW/CC. Wouldn’t we rather choose to believe in something less threatening and ordinary and maybe even something wonderful? So maybe denial is not so surprising.

    I’d like to believe there is no military conflict in the Middle East but I don’t have that choice. People are dying. Neither do we have a choice as to whether to believe in AGW/CC. (I’m ignoring flat earthers here.) It is happening. It is serious and we are causing it. But I’m a rational person with an understanding of science, politics and the Enlightenment. Many hold to belief systems which are not typically subjected to scientific scrutiny. As someone who is very much not “a person of faith” I am appalled by the content some religious beliefs. The rapture and all manner of medieval superstitions and prejudices come to mind. Many have faith and this can lead them to ignore or dismiss science. Believing vs thinking.

    But this is not, thankfully, true of all people of faith. The Right Rev Richard Chartres is the Bishop of London. He’s been in the headlines for a few days following his pronouncement on sin and flying. Now sin is not a word I’m inclined to use but his explanation appeals;

    “Sin means living a life that is turned in upon itself, “missing the mark” and not connecting with the world around you. But growing numbers of people are experiencing a conversion.

    Being converted means experiencing a change of mind to look in a completely different way at the world – not missing the mark. People are realising their profound dependence on the health of the planet. They are learning the extent of human influence on that health. In the light of that conversion you start noticing how many of your lifestyle decisions are selfish. You realise how much of the Earth’s resources you’ve taken for granted: water, clean air, temperate weather. And you start to change the way you organise your life.”

    For the full piece go to: http://society.guardian.co.uk/societyguardian/story/0,,1834831,00.html

    Yup – bring on that carbon consciousness.

    Douglas Coker

  5. Is there a particular psychological problem in the UK because of people being afraid to abandon some of what they think of as Britishness? Also I reckon the media are not very helpful, if people are leaving the country (temporarily or permanently) they’re always talking about going ‘for the sun’ or ‘warmer climes’ even if many of them have quite other reasons. Certainly noone has told them to bear climate hange in mind when blathering their weather comments – the journalists are much worse than the actual weather forecasters on this.

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